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Guide to Responsible Re-Entry

What does the new “norm” look like? 

This is your guide to thinking about Re-Entry and what steps you need to take now to get ready.  These tips are not designed to replace any official direction from State or Federal guidance. 

Responsible re-entry for a business should be as personalized as your mission statement. Your culture, your workforce and the type or size of your business will be considerations when writing a re-entry plan and when determining when to move on to the next phase. Consider the following tips before implementing the plan. 

Safety and Health Costs

Sanitation and protection of employees/patrons may have a cost associated. Bringing employees and patrons back in phases may help off-set some of the cost.

Supplies You May Need: Face masks, gloves, appropriate PPE for your business, hand sanitizer, soap, disinfectant, toilet paper, zip-lock bags

Local Resources for Supplies: Active Threat Solutions, LLC (919-906-7999), Carroll Pharmacy (919-934-7164), Whitley Grocery & Supply, Inc. (919-934-2800)

Local Cleaning Services: PRO Cleaning Solutions (919) 504-2777, Parrish Cleaning Service (919-934-5898), Carolina Xtreme Power Washing (Exterior Cleaning) (919-631-2914)

Other Tools: Magic Murals (877-448-7295) offers social distancing signs and easy-to-apply floor decals to be used for social distancing directives.

Communications

Transparency and constant communication will be key for a successful re-entry. Communication alleviates anxiety for employees and allows them to feel empowered.

Conduct an Employee Survey: Use a survey to help with developing your re-entry plan. This survey should be used to establish who is ready and can come back to work. It can also identify any hardships on the employee which include, but are not limited to, lack of daycare, financial issues and mental stress. This survey should not be used to eliminate jobs or positions.

Sample Survey Questions

Are you comfortable with returning to work?

  • If no, list why.
  • When would you be comfortable with returning to work? (list dates if a date has been set)

Will you have a hardship with returning to work due to:

  • Child Care (many programs for the summer may be cancelled)
  • Caring for another family member?

Have you traveled outside of the region in the last 14 days?

  • Where?
  • Did you self-quarantine after your return?

Have you had any COVID-19 symptoms in the last 14 days?

Has working from home created a significant financial hardship?

Have you been around a person who you know has been diagnosed with COVID-19?

Have you cared for someone with COVID-19?

         

Responsible Re-entry Phase One

Returning Employees

  1. Establish optional work plans.
  • Work remotely when feasible.
  •  Return workforce in phases.
  •  Develop alternating schedules/shifts between working in the office and working remotely.
  1. Employees with a temperature greater than 100.4 F should stay home. Those who feel ill should take sick time or be allowed to work from home for 72 hours.
  2. Employees are encouraged to wear masks.   
  3. Wash hands frequently. Soap and/or hand sanitizer should be provided.
  4. Disinfected personal workstations at the start and end of the workday 

 Building Access  

  1.   Only employees should be allowed in the business. If applicable, limit/control the entry and exit door for employees.
  2.   Tape off the section/desk area to your receptionist at six feet or build a barrier.
  3.   If your business requires outside patrons/guests, consider the following: Require or provide masks. Provide hand sanitizer as they enter the building.

Meeting Rooms

  1.   Meetings should be limited to employees only. Meeting with others should be conducted virtually.
  2.   Reduce the standard room capacity for meetings rooms and personal offices.  
  3.   Disinfect meeting rooms before and after each use.

Common Areas

  1. Close common areas where employees are likely to congregate or enforce strict social distancing protocols. These areas should be disinfected at the end of each day.  
  2. Employees should wash hands before and after placing food in a common area or refrigerator. Food stored in a common refrigerator should be placed into clear zip-lock bags. A name and a date will be written on the bag.
  3. Reduce the capacity number of people in a fitness room/gym. Equipment should be wiped down before and after use. 

Travel

  •  Minimize non-essential travel and adhere to CDC guidelines regarding isolation after travel.

Employee Assistance

  • Human Resources will be readily available to provide assistance on lapsed benefits, questions on COVID-19 issues and mental health assistance. 

Responsible Re-entry Phase Two

Returning Employees

  1.   Continue with optional work plans.
  • Work remotely when feasible.
  • Return workforce in phases.
  • Develop alternating schedules/shifts between working in the office and working remotely.
  1. Employees with a temperature greater than 100.4 F should stay home. Those who feel ill, should take sick time or be allowed to work from home for 72 hours.
  2. Employees are encouraged to wear masks.   
  3. Wash hands frequently. Soap and/or hand sanitizer should be provided.
  4. Disinfect personal workstations at the start and end of the workday.
  5. Consider special accommodations for employees who are members of the vulnerable population.

 Building Access  

  1.   If applicable, limit/control the entry and exit door for employees.
  2.   Tape off the section/desk to your receptionist at six feet or build a barrier.
  3.   For outside patrons and visitors--require or provide masks and provide hand sanitizer as they enter the building.

Meeting Rooms  

  1.   Encourage virtual meetings.
  2.   Reduce the standard room capacity for meetings rooms and personal offices.  
  3.   Disinfect meeting rooms before and after each use.

Common Areas

  1. Close common areas where employees are likely to congregate or enforce strict social distancing protocols. These areas should be disinfected at the end of each day.  
  2. Employees should wash hands before and after storing food or containers in a common area. Food stored in a common refrigerator should be placed into clear zip-lock bags. A name and a date will be written on the bag.
  3. Reduce the capacity number of people in a fitness room/gym. Equipment should be wiped down before and after use. 

Travel

  • Non-essential travel can resume. Consider isolation after travel dependent of traveled location.

Employee Assistance

  • Human Resources will be readily available to provide assistance on lapsed benefits, questions on COVID-19 issues and mental health assistance. 

Responsible Re-entry Phase Three

Returning Employees

  1. Resume normal work schedules.
  2. Encourage best practices hygiene.
  3. Disinfected personal workstations at the start of each day.
  4. Vulnerable employees should practice physical distancing and minimizing unnecessary exposure. 

Building Access  

  • Continue to provide hand sanitizer to patrons/guest as they enter the building.

Meeting Rooms  

  • Disinfect meeting rooms before and after each use.

Common Areas

  1.  All common areas should be disinfected daily.
  2. Fitness equipment should be wiped down before and after use. 

Travel

  • Resume normal travel.

Employee Assistance

  • Programs should remain in place for mental health assistance. 

 

Other Considerations

  • Some companies are utilizing UV Boxes to sterilize PPE, laptops, iPads, etc.  (Must verify before using on sensitive equipment.) Specifications have been received from the Kansas City Crime Lab and use 249 Nano UV bulbs. 

Version 5.2.20

The Triangle East Chamber seeks to provide access to recommendations, regulations, services and expertise to its members.  During the COVID-19 pandemic, this mission remains constant.  Prior to acting, members should consult their own professional advisors for information and counsel specific to the individual and unique situations faced by organizations, individuals and corporations.  The opinions, interpretations and recommendations of the Triangle East Chamber are informational only and should not be relied upon by the recipient as legal or professional advice.  The Triangle East Chamber makes no representations as to the accuracy or reliability of the content contained herein.  Users of this information accept any and all risks associated with the use of such information and agree that the Triangle East Chamber has no liability to user.

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